Try it! – Map features

Features » Try it! – Map features

Both MegAlign Pro and SeqNinja allow you to copy a single annotation, or all annotations from a source sequence to a target sequence. During the process, you may optionally filter features so as to include or exclude specific gene types. In this tutorial, you will…

Try it! – Perform a Clustal Omega alignment

Perform a Multiple Alignment » Try it! – Perform a Clustal Omega alignment

In this tutorial, you will align alcohol dehydrogenase sequences from five animal species using the Clustal Omega algorithm. Begin with Part A: Add and align sequences.

Try it! – Perform a genomic alignment with Mauve

Perform a Multiple Alignment » Try it! – Perform a genomic alignment with Mauve

In this tutorial, you will be adding six nucleotide sequences to MegAlign Pro using drag & drop, and then aligning them with the Progressive Mauve algorithm. Drag and drop is a feature available in all Lasergene applications, and is useful for entering multiple…

Try It! – Follow a multiple alignment with Global pairwise alignments

Perform a Pairwise Alignment » Try It! – Follow a multiple alignment with Global pairwise alignments

This tutorial demonstrates a situation in which a pairwise alignment can help resolve a confusing placement of gaps within a multiple alignment. In this case, a multiple protein sequence alignment suggests that the protein sequence from a specific organism (Tupaia…

Try it! – Perform a MUSCLE alignment with multi-segment sequences

Perform a Multiple Alignment » Try it! – Perform a MUSCLE alignment with multi-segment sequences

Sequences that consist of more than one chromosome, contig, or fragment are called multi-segment files. Suppose you want to string together the consensus sequences from all the contigs in an assembly, or chromosomes in a genome, or exons in a gene, etc. If you enter…

Try it! – Add and align multi-segment sequences

Sequences » Add multi-segment sequences to a project » Try it! – Add and align multi-segment sequences

The following video tutorial describes how to add multi-segment sequences and then align them using the MUSCLE multiple alignment algorithm. The data used is available for free download here: Windows data / Macintosh data.

Try It! – Use Local pairwise alignment to find a gene within a genome

Perform a Pairwise Alignment » Try It! – Use Local pairwise alignment to find a gene within a genome

Consider the case of a researcher who is trying to investigate the role of a gene isolated from a yet-unsequenced Salmonella strain. This strain has already been demonstrated to be both copper and multi-drug resistant. As demonstrated in the following tutorial,…

Try It! – Align transcripts to genes using Local and Global pairwise alignments

Perform a Pairwise Alignment » Try It! – Align transcripts to genes using Local and Global pairwise alignments

This three-part tutorial illustrates the utility of pairwise alignments when comparing mRNA transcripts to their cognate genes. This example begins with multiple alignments of the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) gene from Drosophila melanogaster and four mRNA transcript…

Download and extract tutorial data

Appendix » Download and extract tutorial data

Before beginning a tutorial (“Try it!” topic), you may need to download data from the DNASTAR website: Go to the DNASTAR Training page. Click on MegAlign Pro to expand its section. To the right of Written Tutorial Data, click the name of your…

Comparison of pairwise alignment methods

Perform a Pairwise Alignment » Comparison of pairwise alignment methods

The three types of alignment—Local, Global and Semi-Global—are actually quite similar, although they can often produce very different results. All use a method called dynamic programming to find the best scoring alignment between two sequences.…

Part B: Replace a sequence in the Overview and view the phylogenetic tree

Perform a Multiple Alignment » Try it! – Perform a MUSCLE alignment with multi-segment sequences » Part B: Replace a sequence in the Overview and view the phylogenetic tree

In the Overview, look for the longest segment and the longest gap region (shown in gray) in each sequence. Note that both of these are located on the left for "Rat," and on the right for all the other groups. These clues indicate that the segments for "Rat" were likely…